Three reasons I like to read not-so-well-known blogs

Full many a gem of purest ray serene
The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear:
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. (from “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray)

There are certainly many excellent established blogs out there. I love to read them. But I also like to scour the blogopsphere for hidden gems.

The great blogs are great by consensus and I respect the opinion of the large number of readers vetoing them. But I never know what may have slipped through the lenses of these discerning readersΒ  in the complex system by which blogs acquire good karma.

I trust my own opinion the best where understanding which blogs would suit me the most is concerned.

Excellent quality: There are some blogs out there that are just that. Excellent. For some reason, they don’t get much attention, sometimes because the writers don’t put as much effort into networking in the blogosphere. Often it’s just a case that their content doesn’t have mass appeal. But if I’m one of those readers who is interested in that kind of content, it’s a great read for me. As a reader, I often have to dredge through hundreds of blogs to find these. It’s always a pleasant corroboration of my good readerly instincts to find that a blog I have been following for a while suddenly gets a lot of recognition.

Hard work: The not-so-well-known-yet blogs show a lot of hard work and persistence. It’s relatively easy to keep going when one is receiving encouragement from many readers but it shows real dedication when one continues writing even when there aren’t so many people reading. I find that kind of dedication inspiring.

Fluidity, lack of complacency, openness of voice: This is a major refreshing difference between new, upcoming and relatively obscure blogs and the established ones. The not-so-well-known blogs take risks with their voice, points of view, subject matter and layout in a way that already established players don’t. Perhaps the established players feel like they have too much to lose should an idea not work out. The blogs with fewer readers seem less predictable and more “honest” somehow. There is always a surprise element involved. I never know what I could discover. That’s why I like browsing these smaller blogs.

The sheer number of such blogs provides me with a sense of a multiplicity of voices when I browse them together that I never get reading a selection of established blogs. It feels like there are a lot of people interacting in an everyday sort of way. I like that feeling.

147 thoughts on “Three reasons I like to read not-so-well-known blogs”

  1. One of the reasons it’s so easy to get sucked into prompt groups is that you’re more likely to get views and comments.

    It’s harder for me to work on my own projects, where I will only get up to five people pressing the like button.

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  2. Reblogged this on happyheuristics and commented:
    Excellent post and this does not come from a fan of the blogging mutual admiration society. One reason I’ve identified why my blog is still confidential (beside reason 1) after 6+ months, is that I have “the bum between 2 chairs” as Voltaire would put it: promoting my coaching, exploring and experimenting with my new “niche” with the metaphor/archetype of Icarus :coaching young (less young?) passionate souls (the artist for ex) in a dispassionate (as over pragmatic) professional climate. So the need to be, look, feel pro on the one hand. On the other hand, I enjoy genuinely connecting through blogging and sometimes it’s not so pro…carnivalesque even, with the breaking of boundaries (fool archetype) this mode of interaction sometimes entails: oops! But I don’t think I would have learned so much about the people I am interested to coach without taking this risk. Electronic words stay, be careful of reputation, I hear from colleagues: Rousseau’s prudent ‘esprit de l’escalier”, for another reason of not being so well known does take over at times. A pity. I’m not the type to live a double life separating the pro from the casual, even though some limits in the right place are warranted, I admit. Does such a blog semi-pro, semi-blogging has a chance? We’ll see. For the meantime, I am still enjoying the experiment.
    Michal at Happy Heuristics!

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  3. Hard work: – That’s the paragraph that says it all! My writing does make me happy and I feel as though my blog makes me a better writer. From Crossing The Line to the sequel What Line and who knows what else I will accomplish!

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  4. Looks like this is where I thank you for reading my obscure- but respectable πŸ˜‰ – blog! I appreciate this post, just like everyone above me does, because the points you make are right on the money. I DO have much less to lose by having a smaller audience- don’t have to please the entire world! – and I don’t invest enough (if any) on gaining a wide social-network.
    But sometimes it takes me a long-ass time to come up with the motivation to even write one one much less an entire post, and it takes a lot of freakin work to put it all together if I do finally complete one. Yet it’s very satisfying, even if I get less than 2 likes. (sure, if NOONE likes my post i get a tad pissed off, im only human-)
    Your blog is awesome- helpful, encouraging, and all around a great reading experience! Keep up the good work and thank you for motivating me to continue.

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  5. I like your last part about bloggers voice. I only set mine up the other day (should have done it years ago) but as I was doing it I thought of strength of opinion and how it can affect readership.

    I have some strong opnions on some matters as many people do but I’m not going to steer clear of them on a blog in case it puts people off – otherwise you lose that personality aspect that makes things unqiue.

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  6. Hi BW, thank you for dropping by my blog and liking Isn’t time fun when you’re having flies. I think it meets at least one of your criteria…it’s not well known πŸ™‚

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  7. Likewise, thanks for stopping by and I’m glad you liked my post. I had no idea how random people found my blog but I guess there are people like you who do seek us noddies (noddy no friends) out. I’m terrible at promotion so it’s always a pleasure when someone gets something out of my blog, especially a fellow writer. I just can’t help but think though that with all that promotion how little people are really living or getting things done. And if everybody promotes, isn’t it really like a level ground zero playing field all over again? I’m not very savvy but these are the questions that halt my progress in the ether.

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  8. I agree that there are delights to be found in the lesser-known blogs. I’m so happy that you took a chance and liked mine. I’ll check back on your blog again; it’s engaging and, well, comfortable. Just the way good writing should be.

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  9. So you’re like the indie blog fan in the `sphere? ‘Kay, I’m cool with that XD

    Thanks for stopping by, bottledworder, consider me a fan.

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  10. thx for reading my post. I must say, it’s refreshing to know that you (and others, judging by the comments) actively search through little-known bloggers. kudos! as a pretty much completely unknown blogger (for now!) I feel encouraged to know that there are discerning people out there who don’t just follow a blog because it’s popular. keep on keeping on! I’m going to look through your blog to mine your finds, too!

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  11. Hey BW!

    Thanks so much for liking my post. I’m very chuffed to be counted among the little-known blogs that you like. Looking forward to reading more of your posts soon.

    Sally πŸ™‚

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  12. You nailed it: “The not-so-well-known blogs take risks with their voice, points of view, subject matter and layout in a way that already established players don’t”.
    Otherwise, why use this medium?

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  13. Hi there. What a wonderful little post! I totally agree with you. Refreshing little gems can emerge anywhere – you just have to be open to them. I like your writing, and I like the way you’re open to other writing too. Great work!

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  14. Brilliant post! Your dedication in braving the blogging wilderness to hunt down the Bambis of blog writers is much appreciated. Hopefully you were rewarded for your detective work with a chuckle or three. Thanks for liking my post πŸ™‚

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  15. Very insightful post. I hope that’s why you stop by and listen because Lord knows I’m not freshly pressed… Yet. Networking and reading others is definitely good stuff and inspiring. Cheers to that!

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  16. Thank you so much for liking my post. I am honored. I’ve just started my adventure on the Blogosphere — writing and reading — and I’m following your blog. I really appreciate your thoughts and how you express them, with such a generosity of spirit. Thanks for all you do.

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  17. I agree. I love reading blogs. I subscribe to some well known blogs that have tons of followers, but I also subscribe to bloggers who are just starting out. I just moved my blog from Blogger to WordPress, and while the actual process of moving content was a breeze, trying to notify my followers has not been so easy. But, I’ve made some new friends which has made the transition worthwhile.

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  18. I’ve only been blogging for a short time, but I’m encouraged by the generosity of spirit out there. It may be because artists in general know it takes some courage to step out and makes mistakes while learning the ropes. Blessings to you.

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  19. Thanks for dropping by my not-so-well-known blog. I’m very bad, but hope to do better. I’m still trying to figure out how to manage all this stuff without getting buried under all the words.

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  20. Often, we smaller fry have nothing to lose and so can afford that greatest of treasures – the truth! Writers who are in the system have to keep an eye on their grant-providers and competitors and so they make compromises and generally waffle on.

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  21. I found your reasons refreshing …and enlightening. I have no idea how you came upon my blog, but I’m glad you did and that you liked it. I’m not really trying very hard to gain recognition for my blog. I believe we all have a lot to learn from the writers of the letters that I’m posting. I’m willing to let them “sell” themselves. The writers lived in a world with different values, ones that I feel are very important if we are to survive. History repeats itself over and over and I believe we’re going in the wrong direction. I hope to bridge generations with my stories and the lessons learned through them. (I guess it’s time for me to get off my soap box !!)

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  22. Good post. There is an element of surprise on the unknowns and can turn up the occasional hidden gem. It is easy to go with what everybody thinks is good, but appeasing the masses to me seems like going with the lowest common denominator. Keep up the good work!

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  23. Thanks for liking my post! I appreciate it and I hope you stop by again! I enjoyed this post, and I agree that sometimes it’s easier for bloggers with smaller audiences to “mix it up” a little bit and throw some surprise content out there. πŸ™‚ Happy writing!

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